Archives for category: Media

As of 2pm on the day of the Budget, the below were the first headlines of each of the respective newspapers / media outlets. Read full headline list »

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On Monday afternoon Alastair Campbell, Tony Blair’s communications supremo, fired a shot across the bow(el)s of Nick Watt, the Guardian’s chief political correspondent.

This tale of political fart-throwing began with an article written by Watt correlating Dave (my wife’s pregnant) Cameron’s below performance at Lewisham College to that of John Major’s infamous election turn-around of ’92 – the much fabled election campaign that saw Major take to the streets armed with an upturned soap-box. Read the rest of this entry »

Let me take you somewhere. Stick this on in the background, and get involved with the below.

After several months ignoring Conservative party electioneering, this weekend saw Labour waddle up to the edge of the pool and penguin dive into the deep end. It began on Saturday with Gordon and Harriet taking a well scripted jaunt up the M40 to Warwick University and ended with a full blown multi-pronged war of words.

Competing in the inaugural race of this years swim meet were Gordon Brown, The Observer, Journalists at large, the wider media, social tea party goers and an apparently innocent bystander with a floppy tongue. Read the rest of this entry »

Friday night saw the airing of the second part in the BBC’s four part serious charting the history of the Royal Navy in respect to it’s relevance in shaping our country’s rich history.

As our host Dan Snow swam through the years, we were transported back to the waters off western France in 1690. Having lost 100 merchant navy ships carrying an entire year’s worth of British trade, King William III launched into a long term strategy to build the worlds biggest navy. By 1759, with the help of her citizens, Britannia ruled the waves.

The scheme that was launched saw the government offer fixed interest returns for all monies invested into this new institution, The Bank of England. For their wares, investors would receive an annual interest of 8pc. Britons, from bricklayers to bankers to the Royal Family dug into their pockets and invested in the country’s future. In spending this money building hundreds of battle ships within our shores, industry was born in the UK. With secure exportation of trade guaranteed by our brand spanking Navy, tax coffers were filled and the government was cordially able to return all monies to her benefactors. The British Empire had arrived.

Last week in Haiti, just across the water from the site of one of the British Navy’s most decisive victories – the Battle for Porto Bello, we saw the incomparable destruction of a country by natural means. Read the rest of this entry »

It’s clear that micro-blogging is seeing an exponential increase
in uptake (comScore suggested 31bn web vids were viewed by 170m US internet users in November alone, with the average length being 4min).

The serious numbers of competing sites (micros such as Qik.com, Twitvid, ustream and 12seconds and the majors, Hulu and Vimeo et al), all vying for prominence, would suggest that users are heading in the multimedia micro-blogging
direction.

Youtube has undoubtedly been a massive hit throughout the
past 5-6 years. The two biggest hindrances to MASS (<10pc of users
provide 100pc of content) appeal, however, are the necessity for users to edit footage and the time it takes to upload. Read the rest of this entry »

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